QLD

10 Tips for Running in the Heat

by Shona Stephenson on November 4, 2014

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Shona Stephenson March 2014 - 005

Ultra Trail Runner Shona Stephenson 10 Tips for training in the heat.

10 Tips for Running in the Heat

70% of your power, strength and endurance can be lost if you are overheating. Your body will send blood to your skin to produce sweat for evaporation rather than to your muscles. Overheating and dehydrating can head to muscle melt down and even death. Here are my 10 Tips for Running the Heat.

  1. Wear a Singlet.

Air flow to your armpits  is essential to cooling your core temperature. Our armpits sweat and the evaporation from the sweat off our skin on our armpits cools our skin. Our armpits produce the most amount of sweat in our body. Keep this area free and exposed so air can flow over our armpits and cool your body down. Keeping your armpits exposed will also allow for your core temperature heat to escape.

2) Wear a VISOR  NOT a Cap. 

Wearing a visor will protect your forehead from direct sun light and heat. It will allow for heat to escape from the top of your head. Your visor will also keep your face shaded. A visor can also be dunked into steams, creeks, rivers, ocean whilst on the run and used as a cooling your head.

3) Stay Hydrated with Electrolytes.

Staying hydrated will prevent the body from over heating. If your body is over heating you will lose up to 70% of your power, strength and endurance. Being hydrated is one of the best ways to keep your core temperature under control. Drinking Plain Water can be extremely dangerous and can lead to Hyponatremia or death.  It is essential that electrolytes are consumed with or in your water. A good product is Hammer Endurolyte’s. Your electrolytes are important for your muscular and heart function. Magnesium help your muscles relax, calcium contract, potassium is for the communication between the nerve endings and your muscles including your heart and sodium is to help prevent muscular cramps.

Have  fresh clean water on hand for when I feel like my mouth needs some plain water when racing a marathon or ultra. Consume Electrolytes every 30-min to 1 hour when training or racing.

4) Drink Regularly and Check your Hydration

The best way to find out how much you should be consuming per hour is to perform a sweat test. As a general rule about 400ml-600ml can be consumed per hour during exercise. 500ml per hour is a good place to start. Drink to thirst.

Check your hydration by monitoring your urine.

Clear Urine No Odour- Too much water you are in need of electrolytes.

Light Urine Yellow No Odour- Perfect hydration.

Dark Urine Yellow Odour- Dehydrated Drink Fluids.

Brown Urine- Kidney Failure Go Straight to hospital.

Other Signs of Dehydration

Dry Mouth, Spittle on Lips, Headaches, “Heart beating out your ears”, Dizziness, Nausea, Lethargy, Cramps, Muscular Tears and Sore Muscles

5) Drink Chilled or Frozen Electrolytes

Fluid chilled to 4 degrees Celsius has the fastest absorbing rate into your stomach. When racing or training in hot conditions freeze hydration bottles in the freezer over night then wear them in a vest like the Inov-8 Race Ultra Vest. Cooling your body down from the outside with the frozen bottles and also internally by drinking the melted fluid from the frozen hydration bottles. Hydralyte Icy Poles are also great to have handy for during or post training or race. Whilst racing. Place the Icy Poles down your bra or in your hydration pack. Add ice to your bladder too.

6) Tip Water Over Your Head

As your arm pits work to sweat to keep your body cool, tipping water over your head, neck, chest will also cool your body down. The initial cold water on your skin will lower your skin surface temperature. The extra moisture on your skin will add to your sweat and increase the evaporation of water off your skin. Long hair will work as a wet brush on your shoulders and back constantly providing a cool wet surface on your skin.

7)Underdress not Over Heat.

Wearing the least amount of clothing is the best way to help your skin do it’s job by providing the most amount of surface area for sweat to evaporate from. Your clothing should look like this.

Visor

Singlet or crop top for women.

Above Thigh Shorts

Crew Socks

Shoes.

8) Wear Sunscreen.

Avoid getting sunburnt and wear a light sports sunscreen that allows your skin to breath but still protect you from getting sunburn, thus sun stroke. Wearing Sunscreen will also protect your skin from skin cancer.

9) Adjust Your Pace

Running at 32 degrees in over 75% Humidity is like running at altitude at 2500m. No wonder we all suffer in the heat. Just like if you were running at altitude you’d run slower and adjust your pace to accommodate the lack of oxygen in your muscles. You will also need to do this in the heat. As noted above, if your body is not fully acclimatised to running in the heat 70% of your blood flow will be in your skin and not your muscles, that’s why it’s so hard. Slow down. Monitor your vital signs. Check your hydration with a urine test, make sure you are not over heating, take Enduralytes, have a cold drink or an Icy Pole, Wet your Visor.

10) Acclimatise

Just as you would need to acclimatise to altitude you will need to acclimatise to racing and training in the heat. If you are planing on racing in hot conditions it will take at least two weeks to acclimatise to the hotter temperatures .

Your heart rate can be elevated to more than 10 beats a minute more than exercising in cooler temperatures. It takes 1 week for your heart rate to return back to normal BPM and the second week is for your sweat glands to acclimatise to the hot conditions.

 

10 Tips for Running in the Heat

10 Tips for Running in the Heat 10 Tips for Running in the Heat 10 Tips for Running in the Heat 10 Tips for Running in

Lamington Classic

by Shona Stephenson on October 30, 2014

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Trail Runner Shona Stephenson winning the Lamington Classic
Stephenson Inov-8 Trail Runner Winning the Lamington Classic

Lamington Classic

For about 15 years I’ve wanted to visit the Lamington World Heritage Listed National Park. It took a  back to back event with 42km Saturday and a 21km Sunday race to give me enough motivation to finally get there. The Lamington Classic has a historic South East Queensland trail running event that has been around since 1970. It is said to be the oldest trail running event in Australia. The Lamington Classic has an amazing history of great runners who have run the 21km distance from Binna Burra to O’Reily’s for over the 30 years.

Initally the event ran one way only for example from O’Reilys to Binna Burra Lodge and then the following year the opposite way. Then the race was evolved into the 21km O’Reilys to Binna Burra on the Saturday then Binna Burra to O’Reily’s on the Sunday. Last year was the first year that the race ran as a 42.2km out and back from Binna Burra to O’Reily’s return on the Saturday. Is your head in a spin yet? Confusing? Yes. Heaps of fun? Yes.

My adrenalin was pumping on the drive into the Lamington Plateau. I love racing in new locations, it always brings a new adventure. I arrived at Binna Burra Grooms Cottage registration and I was introduced to the great Bruce Hargreaves AKA Digger. The Lamington Classic is his baby. Digger shook everyones hand, introduced himself as Digger as we all arrived in the Grooms Cottage at Binna Burra Lodge. What event does a race director take the time and effort to meet, greet and make every runner feel special? This race was small, relaxed, and a far cry from the Ultra Trail du Mt Blanc (UTMB) that I’d raced only 6 weeks before. I loved the relaxed atmosphere of the Lamington Classic.  It reminded me of my first every trail event The Great Nosh in Sydney and the Deep Space Mountain Marathon in Canberra.

I believe that Digger has had to work tirelessly with Queensland Parks and Wildlife to get this race off the ground and to keep it running for 46 years. The course records are staggering. Some say the track is slower and more eroded now. What ever! I still am in total admiration of Nikki Carroll who managed to run the 21km course in 1 hour 35 minutes. Thats on the Long Course. If you want a shot at the record you have to run it on the Long Course which is about 800m further than the 21.1km course we will be running. It will take one special runner to beat some of the 21km records.

The logistics of the Lamington Classic are a bit crazy and difficult for me to get my head around at first. I even had to call up Digger and ask him where the start line was and if it was at the same place as when I’d be staying in the Bunks. Too funny, I was totally lost in the event notes. It’s weird to talk about logistics in an event. To be honest with you running the out and back marathon st Binna Burra seemed like the easiest option logistically wise.

Okay let’s talk logistics, to race the Lamington Classic it’s kind of essential I try and explain the logistics.The remoteness of both the start and end points really is what makes this event so special but a bit of a nightmare with your cars. I chose not to worry about the logistics until after I’d raced my marathon, mainly because I was so confused. Bruce Hargraves AKA Digger and his mates organise car shuffles, car pooling or people to drive your car from Binna Burra to O’Reily’s for all the 75 runners for the Sunday 21km run. Nuts! Yes your car can be delivered to you at the finish line. Yes! Amazing. Once you’ve driven these roads you can appreciate what lengths these guys go to to look after the runners. The roads are not for the faint hearted, the bends were narrow and in a fair amount of the mountain road only one car could fit. The Lamington Classic is such a chilled out low key event that handing your car keys over to these guys whom potentially you’ve only spoken a few words too seemed perfectly normal to all the other runners except for my mate Steven and myself who on Saturday afternoon after racing the 42km marathon still could not get our heads around the thought of depositing our car keys into a key box and trusting your car to makes it to the other range at O’Reily’s the next day. Are they joking? I think both Steven and I did not want to put anyone out and did not want to appear like we were totally clueless of the logistics.  It seemed a bit weird, too good to be true. Totally unheard of. Instead Steven from NZ and me from Sydney, the two novice out of towners did a 3 hour car shuffle to get one of our cars to O’Reily’s for Sunday and then we had to pick up the other car after the race. DOH! Instead of just handling over our car keys to the spectators to drive over to the O’Reily’s Finish line. Total trust. This is Queensland. Things happen differently up here. On the plus side we did spend a few hours at O’Reily’s. There is an awesome suspension bridge rainforest walk and tree house to check out. The cafe is also has one of the best views of the ranges in the area. See not a total waste of time.

Accommodation could be obtained at either Binna Burra Lodge or O’Reily’s. Digger puts on a presentation dinner for everyone including friends and family on the Saturday Night. Breaky, lunches are organised too for all the racing periods. Presentation lunch on the Sunday after the 1/2 Marathon too. It all runs like a well oiled machine. A lovely social running weekend.

 

Okay with the logistics out of the way, hot chips eaten, coffee’s drunk it was time to race.

 

The Race

 

The Binna Burra 42.2 start like the rest of the Lamington Classic was totally relaxed. All the runners were called to the start line and whilst walking to the start line from the picnic area we were told we were running late and we had to run to the start line so their watches will synchronise with the timers at O’Reily’s. With a warm up trot to the start at the Lamingtion National Park sign post we counted down, said a few hello’s and we were off with little fuss.

I cruised off with a group of two guys and my mate Steven. I lead and was able to set the pace along the Boarder Track. We chilled out and paced ourselves in a group for the first 6km of lovely single trail, which soon turned to amazing single track of amazing untouched virgin rain forest, covered in ferns, lichen, lily’s, snaking its way across creek beds, climbing up for the first 13km to the top of the Lamingtion Plateau.

Wow! The views were amazing. Mountains in the mist for as far as the eye could glimpse between dangerous trail steps. We chatted as a group, really enjoying ourselves along some of the prettiest trails I’ve ever seen. I really mean that. I’ve race in France, Japan, New Zealand and the laming ton Classic is just beautiful. Our group chilled out and totally paced ourselves, this race felt more like a relaxed training run. The Lamingtion Classic trails are just magic, I kept reminding myself how lucky I was that I’d finally made it to this part of the world after 15 years of dreaming about it.

The Lamingtion Classic course followed the ridge between NSW and QLD along a narrow cliff track. The Queensland surveyor must have been a genius setting the boarder between NSW and QLD which we were now following. The track was tiny in sections. One slip and the drop would break bones. Deadly drop offs were frequent along the track and it took full concentration to stay on two feet. At the top of the Lamingtion Plateau the bloke behind me, Daniel Hooley slipped on a rock shelf and almost slid off the cliff into the valley below. We all stopped dead in our tracks and made sure he was safe, back on his feet and able to run. It gave us all a real dose of reality. At parts the track was only 40cm in width, slippery in the fog and heavily eroded in some places.

After 15ks the track started to descend and I opened up and started to kick it a bit, curving along the mist covered cliffs and turned a corner and my footing totally gave way. I slipped over and with adrenalin pumping thorough my body I jumped out of fear and landed in the ferns on the mountain slide of the cliff track, on my back with both feet in the air. Fuck. It must have been hilarious to watch. It scared the shit out of me and also the guys following me. They all checked that I was okay, being true gentlemen resisted the urge to over take me while I was flat on my back. I jumped up a bit embarrassed and we were off and running again. I think they got the stack on their Go Pro.

We opened up again, jumping, dodging, weaving our way down the rocky ridge and when the path widened we knew that O’Reily’s was about 2ks away.

We ran along the now bitumen trail, up a small rise and into O’Reily’s Boarder Track Start/End Point. I grabbed some supplies and thanked the organisers for their help and while my back was turned the guys were off, sprinting up the 7km climb. I totally lost them within a 30sec stop. 1 hour 57 min. It was game on and those boys had a plan and used their position at the back of the pack to their advantage. Steven was ahead of me and I tried my best to run him down but my legs felt like they were full of lead. Totally trashed quads.

I soon caught up with Steven while he took a nature stop and I told him not to wait for me because he was doing it so bloody easy. He is one of my Ultra Training Australia (UTA) clients and he was kicking my butt! I always knew he had it in him. “Go chase them down, don’t worry about me”. I instructed. He’d never been in a podium position before. Off he went to kick some butt and test himself.

About 3 ks in I spotted Jess another UTA client also looking fresh on the out and back. We high fived each other. I gave the next female a high five too. I did anything to take my mind off the pain I was feeling. I was stuffed. I love out and backs, they can really boost your morale if you cheer and wave to the other runners.

I did my best to just try and stay consistent, turning my legs over and focusing on what is important and before long I was at the top of the plateau and my legs were given some relief. The scenery was just amazing. The reverse of the track gave a totally different perspective of the terrain through ferns, creeks, mosses, lichen, lily’s, it was like a perfect enchanted fairy garden. I loved every inch of this part of the world. I spotted plants I’d never seen before and I was just enjoying the whole experience.

I snaked down the descent, across a dried creek, fixed my water bottle and totally stacked it, flat on  my face, arms sprawled, rolling up onto my chest, face planted to the side, with my feet almost touching my head. I landed hard on a rock that gave my left quad a corky. Man it hurt. I jumped up, in pain, groaning, pulling my Inov8 compression shorts over my bruised quad and started running again.

Now my abbs were killing me with every breath, every step. I’d over stretched them in my arching chest roll stack. Ripping up my separation in my abs. Ouch. Sore, sore lower abbs. I focused on what was important. Knee drive forward, lifting my feel high enough off the ground, drinking, eating, and in the back of my mind knowing I was racing the 21ks the following day. I counted out my steps and raced with all my heart or as fast as my miler legs would take me down the plateau.

The path widened, I waved to the walkers and said hello to the Korean tourist, Aussie Tourist and about 1k from the end I looked up and waved to more Aussie tourist cheering for me, tripped, fell, rolling on my shoulder behind a tree, off the track and down the bank. Man that must of looked funny. One minute I was sprinting along the track totally in control, the next I was rolling down the side of the track. I jumped up like an embarrassed cat and started sprinting again. Desperately trying to get a good time for the marathon.

I sprinted into the finish line in 1st female place and 4th place overall 4 hours 05 minutes breaking the record by 22 minutes. (The Marathon Record was only 1 year old unlike the 1/2 marathon records). Steven managed a 3rd place behind the two blokes who only beat him by 17 seconds. He was then left to wonder what if he’d pushed harder from the start…….

Jess was 2nd female overall. It was a great result for our little training group.

 

 

Day 2

So with the car shuffles done the runners were divided into waves, start times written on our recycled race bibs with a text-a. The slowest runners were to run off first and the fastest runners last. Meaning that at the finish line of O’Reily’s there was the least amount of waiting time for the runners. It was actually a really nice way to run it. A bit like the old days of the 6 Foot Track, when the veterans started first. Us younger faster runners are able to catch, chat and be inspired by the 66 year old female runner out on the track.

Steven and I left in the 8am wave, sore and stiff. Both of us seemed to be the only runners nutty enough to race the double of the Lamingtion Classic 42km Saturday and 21km on the Sunday. I guess we both have that ultra runner brain, if there is a race that will push us and our limits we will do it. Jess had to work on the Sunday so she was really missed, we were bummed we did not have enough runners to form a team. You need 3 runners on both days to form a team. Steven and I are both new comers to Brisbane area and don’t know too many runners yet.

With the count down on we were off and running. This time Steven only stayed behind me for about 3 minutes, learning from his experience from yesterday, he has become way more stronger than he once thought. He found his rhythm and cruised his Kiwi legs up the 13km climb and out of sight. I was shot to shit. Totally hurting with no bounce in my legs. I counted out my tempo and before long the track narrowed and I did my best to keep moving in the right direction. The track looked totally different from the day before. The later start and the sun shining meant that the light was different and it appeared to be a totally new trail I was running on.

I gave myself a goal to run the 21km in the same time as I ran it the day before with fresh legs. At the 1/2 way mark I was about 3 minutes behind on schedule after most of the climbing was done. I dug deep. Hopped across creeks, snaked up the mountain, crossed the rocky out crop dodging earlier wave runners who all kindly moved aside for me to pass and powered to the top of the plateau. I was really quietly frightened of the drop off I’d almost fallen down the day before. My imagination getting the best of me. After about 15ks I was pleased to have past my fall zone safely. Today it looked like a totally harmless drop off, yesterday in the mist it looked hairy. What a difference a day makes.

The climbing all done I rolled down the descent, twisting my ankles on day old strapping tape 3 times on the rocky trail. About 2 ks to go the track widened, flattened out and I dug deep, feeling great now, hit the bitumen, lifted my knees up the final climb and into the finish line in about the same time as I ran this section of the course the day before. 1 Hour 57 Minutes. Not that fast, still not a bad result on tired legs. I still managed to win the Sunday 1/2 marathon, Steven finished 4th overall. He beat me by more than 3 minutes. Nice one Steven.

 

Saturday Results 42.2km

Daniel Hooley 3:58:57

Justin Williams 3:58:58 Daniel and Justine crossed the finish line together as mates

Steven Pemberton 3:59:13

 

Shona Stephenson 4:05:21

Jessica Schluter 4:45:21

Jo Collins 5:13:25

 

There was a problem with the Sunday 21km Results.

They have not officially been released yet on paper so I can’t add them to this blog.

We were all given our awards at presentation with our lunch and have been told that Digger will fix them when he is back from the much deserved holidays in the States. Here is the Facebook page for Digger

 

Race Kit

I’m sponsored by Inov-8

Inov-8 X-Talons

Injinji Socks

Inov-8 Race Elite Shorts

Inov-8 Race Elite Tank

Inov-8 Fitness Bra

Inov-8 Race Elite Vest

Hammer Visor

Nutrition
I’m Sponsored by Hammer

Hammer Heed 500ml 1 scoop per hour

Hammer Banana Gels 1 gel every hour in a watered down Inov-8 Race Bottle

Hammer Endurolyte’s every 30 min.

 

 

Pomona King of the Mountain

by Shona Stephenson on October 27, 2014

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Shona Stephenson at Pomona King of the Mountain 2014

Shona Stephenson at Pomona King of the Mountain 2014

Pomona King of the Mountain 2014

 

I was totally smashed in the quads from The Kokoda Challenge 98km, really 110km. Our team got horribly lost and ended up running an extra 12 ks, DOH! I ran the Kokoda Challenge only 1week earlier and still recovering from a health issue so I knew it was not going to be a pretty run for me at the 35th Pomona King of the Mountain.  It was going to hurt! Stuff it! I love racing and I really did not want to miss the Pomona King of the Mountain. If I listen to everyone who told me I should not do something I would not be here today. I would not have run past 10km after breaking both my feet in 2010.

This race sounded like way too much fun, it had it’s own legends, record holders Maree Stephensen who camped on the mountain to train and run it every day for a week. Pomona King of the Mountain race commands fear, respect and requires’ a whole heap of adrenalin and balls to make it to the top and back down the rocky mountain again. I’d read about Pomona King of the Mountain which is located in the Glass House Mountains, north west of Noosa on the Sunshine Coast in the book “Feet in the Clouds”. I don’t think there is an event quite like it in Australia.
Now living in Queensland, I really was so happy to get the chance to race iconic Pomona King of the Mountain. The Pomona Village really get involved in this event and put on a real country fair with stalls, rides, lollies, food, bands and run multiple races up the mountain so the whole family can have a chance to run up a section of the mountain. The atmosphere was electric with quirky country twang. I could not help but smile, relax and soak up the country hospitality.

The volcanic mountain in Pomona sticks out of the plains and rises to 439m high. It is easily spotted from the Bruce HWY. “Mum that’s the mountain I think your running up”. My kids said from the back of there car. Cool, this looks like it will be fun, scary but fun.It looked like an ankle  busting terrain, I was really excited my adrenaline was pumping. Sweet! Absolute smash and bash fest, the total opposite to what I’m use to.

The race has about a 600m elevation gain and loss in only 4.2km. The Aussies race the Kiwis and who ever wins the event, male or female will run the sister event in New Zealand.

I did not do any training on the mountain, not the best lead up. My friends said its a really good idea to train on the mountain. I just was not fit or well enough. Again life is not perfect. I was just there to give it a crack, have fun, test my cardio fitness, climbing skills and technical descending. Who cares if I’m not going to be at my best? I just wanted to race this event, enjoy the test because it looked like I was going to have a ball.

The Pomona King of the Mountain has a late 3pm start which was great because me kids could do their Sunday Activities have lunch, jump on the rides, eat lollies and run themselves ragged while I warmed up and got myself ready for the start line.

After registration in which every on of the 100 athlete’s names are called and handed their race Bib and goodie pack in the local Scout Hall, we all make our way down to the start line and again every runners name is called 100-1. From the hackers at the back of the pack 100 to the race favourites 1 was called out at the start line and asked to do a lap of honour in the main street of the town. I’m glad to say the runners were from all ages, shapes and sizes names were being called out and introduced to the crowd. This event is not just for the elites it is for everyone who is fit, agile, tough enough and who have the balls to take their life in their own hands on the descent. Programs were written and distributed to the crowd with every athletes name, occupation, suburb they lived in and bib number so spectators could yell your name as you ran past. It was pretty cool. There is no race quite like it. The crowd, town, local community, really got behind this event.

Thousands of spectators cram into the Pomona town square, streets, Bendigo Box (someone’s front deck of their house), Hecklers Hill (the rowdy hill at the start and finish at the end of the road, start of the bush full of locals enjoying a good laugh, picnic food and of course bevo’s) scream out the athletes name as they run past. The whole race is filmed by local TV channels and a chopper films the proceedings from the air so the crowd can watch the race from the town square on the big screen. The atmosphere is really fun and totally Australian,  real home town country hospitality, all the runners and their families are made to feel really special. After my lap of honour, which felt a bit weird, I lined up at the start line and prepared myself to hurt like hell.

10, 9,8,7,6,5,4,3,2,1 and we were off and starting the climb up the main street, past the “Bendigo Box”, turning left, then bending to the right descending down “Hecklers Hill”, crossing the creek then climbing up to the base of the mountain. I don’t normally run events this short, so from the get go it was all guns a blazing. I felt totally out of my depth, pushing my comfort zone, breathing hard and fast, trying to get enough O2 into my lungs. I was past straight away by local legend Leslie Saunders who’s long legs carried her swiftly to the base of the stairs. I wished for legs like that.

On the trail, Adventure Racing gun, Kim Beckinsale, jumped ahead of me with her legs cut from her winning a 2 hour adventure race that morning. Kim is a compact machine, all guts and determination. In her warm up lap I could see she was hurting in her quads, she was doing bloody well to be here at all. She moved ahead of me then slowed down a bit and I jumped ahead of her, she jumped ahead of me and a young 16 year Dominica Fitzaimon jumped ahead of me at the base of the stairs. The race to the top was on.

Before long I was on the bush stair climb and Kim just disappeared up the stairs picking the blokes off one by one. Man she was tough, a true weapon. I managed to get ahead of the Dominica and a few blokes and did my best to try and pass more but I was not strong enough to pass them on the stairs. The path was steep now switching from long steps to bare faced rock with chains.

My quads were killing me, I had nothing in them, they felt weak, my calves were burning, chest doing its best to get enough air into my lungs. The guys were slowing, they slowed me down but I really was not strong enough to get past. I counted my way up the mountain just focusing on my breathing, trying not to panic, the pain was so intense. I was totally maxed out just wishing the top to come sooner than physically possible.

I spotted Ben Duffus now on the descend, jumping, flying, bounding, literally getting air born as he manoeuvred himself down the dangerous rock face. I wished him good luck and pulled to the side on the out and back course.

Okay Hun, it’s time to move, I said to myself. I took a wide line and started passing some walkers, hands on quads, crawling, dragging myself up the mountain, on all fours, toes, fingers gripping desperately onto the rock face, doing my best not to fall or cause a fall on the staggering steep course while now dodging the descenders on the out and back course.

More hands on quads, more stairs, more chains to pull, more pain, more gasping, more wishing and I was finally at the top. Hobbling from the lactic build up in my legs. I checked in and out and started the descent down the steepest descent I ever experienced. My quads were stuffed and not functionally properly, I slid, jumped, fell, grabbed, bounded, caught trees, held chains for stability as I did my best to pass the blokes on the descent, trying to run down Kim and Leslie or at least pull back some time on the descent.

I bounded, grabbed, fell, slipped, slid, jumped over rocks, stairs, grates, for the next 300m of descent and was relieved to make it down the mountain with my heavily strapped ankles in one piece. I hit the bush stairs racing them 2 at a time, bounded on to the fire trail, sprinting with all my heart, working harder than I’ve worked in a long, long time. I’ve been too injured or sick to do any interval training so this was hurting! i tried to not lose any places to any males or females on the flat and did my best to real in a few.

I hit the creek, ascended Hecklers Hill, turned a right then a left onto the road, closed my eyes, and ignored all that my brain was telling me, telling it to shut up and it was not needed. I just needed to run. I rolled into the finish line a full 2 minutes behind Kim and Leslie, totally spent. I’d never worked that hard in an event. It was so tough. I worked so hard I was shaking, quads shattered, calves in a mess, lips dry and smackey. Dominica came in 4th and won her Junior Category. Australian women took out the top 4 places.

The minute I finished I had a camera in my face from one of the local TV stations and gave an interview for channel 7 or 9, Win or Prime, I really can’t remember. The whole event was covered by helicopters and ground journalist.
The Pomona King of the Mountain is such a special event. It has everything, ticks all the boxes. Awesome technical single trail,adrenaline rushing descent, VO2 MAX climbs,  family activities, food, wine, Hecklers Hills, Bendigo Bank Box, massive crowds to cheer you on and even a helicopter to film you on live TV up the Mountain. I don’t think I’ve ever enjoyed myself as much in such a short event. This race has it all. The Aussies took out both of the awards at least we can beat the Kiwis at trail running on our own turf.

It was just a shame that at preso’s that I was called out as the “Open Winner” before Kim and Leslie had their veteran category presented. It caused a fair amount of confusion in the crowd because I clearly was not the winner. Maybe in the past the Open winner was the Overall winner so there was not a problem in the past? I don’t know.  A veteran won the event and came 2nd. The formalities were already given to the males and the crowd was expecting the same protocol for the women. I was even stopped by a female spectator in the crowd who was watching the presentations after I was on the stage and questioned me about wether I’d won the trip to New Zealand. Trust me, she let me know that I did not win and that it was not fair for me to receive the prize because I was not the overall winner. It was confusing. I was not awarded the prize trip to NZ and  I agreed with her. I can only do what the race director wants me to do with presentations. I clearly did not win and it was a bit of a shame that Kim and Leslie were called to the stage well after me. I guess what we all have to remember it’s not just the athletes who see the inequality it is also the mothers, sisters, daughters, female friends standing in the crowd who see it too. The men were given their own 1st, 2nd, 3rd Overall category win, plus age group awards for 1,2,3 but the women were not treated the same. It was a really awkward moment. The Pomona King of the Mountain were extremely generous with the prizes with giving out age category wins  1,2,3 and I am thankful for that, it goes above and beyond what is expected.  It appeared to the crowd that I was awarded the win before the true winner and it just did not seem right, it felt like I’d cheated Kim and Leslie. I also missed out on congratulating Kim and Leslie formally and have them stand ahead of me on the podium. I really respected these two women as athletes in their own right and they deserved to have the right treatment and have them stand ahead of me. In 2014 women should not have to ask for the same treatment as the men. I guess we can take equality for granted and expect that it just happens all on it’s own and us sisters don’t have to ask the questions. Nothing happens unless someone asks the question.

After The Pomona King of the Mountain I wrote to the race director explaining that it was a confusing awards presentation process, explaining how it did not seem fair that I was called to the stage awarded the open win before the female winner, 2nd Place was awarded their prize. It did not feel right. To The Pomona King of the Mountains credit he replied to me the very next day after having a meeting with their committee. The Pomona King of the Mountain committee decided that it was an out-dated awards process and that after 35 years the women in 2015 will have the same awards given to them as the men.

Well done Pomona King of the Mountain. This race has total thumbs up from me and I will be racing it again in 2015. It is a world class profession event.

Women

1st Kim Beckinsale 31.11 Aus

2nd Leslie Saunders 31.39 Aus

3rd Shona Stephenson 33.37 Aus

Go the Aussie chicks!

Men

1st Ben Duffus – 23.47 Aus

2nd Lance Downie 26.16 NZ

3rd Aaron Knight 26.26 ? (can anyone tell me. I’m new to Pomona King of the Mountain and Queensland).